Quote: No Second Chances on the Internet

“For nearly a decade, the start-up mantra has been ‘release early and release often‘. It is time to amend that line of thinking. Just as it is hard for a movie to recover from a bad opening weekend, today’s ‘apps’ are likely to lose their place in the marketplace if they don’t make a good first impression.”

Om Malik, founder of GigaOM

Source: gigaom.com

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18 Mrz 2011, 2:09am
by Katharina Familia Almonte

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Group Messaging and Foursquare for People

Last week the famous SXSW conference took place in Austin, Texas, causing a big buzz in the tech and startup scene. Prior to the conference, many tech blogs took a guess on the one new app that would break out, like Twitter or Foursquare did in the years before. But it seems as if nobody really made it that far. Life in Texas is probably back to normal, the elite of the startup scene went back home and since there is no new Facebook or Twitter, women will probably still have problems to decide whether they should use the bathroom or rather update there status. ;-) .

However, some of the apps presented seem to have a great potential. So let’s take a look at the most promising ideas!

Yobongo

The most popular trend this year was group messaging. One example for this new hype is Yobongo, an app that wants to compete with the good old telephone rather than with Facebook. Even nowadays, it still takes up to one minute for a SMS to be sent, and reducing this delay was the main purpose for the team of Yobongo. They developed an iPhone app that localizes where you are and places you in a real-time chat room with people around you. You can just see what others talk about, or hop into the conversation yourself. However, since the service is based on the app and mobile web access, to be able to chat with others they have to download it too. I installed Yobongo to try it out myself, but up to now you can only use it in New York, San Francisco or Austin. Probably it will still take a little while till they introduce their service out here in Paris. I am really curious to find out, how successful this real-time chatroom with strangers around you will be.


GroupMe

GroupMe is another group messaging service, but based on actual SMS. It can be used on every phone that can send or receive text messages. With so called “command” text messages to GroupMe you can set up messaging groups and add your friends. You can then send text messages to everybody in your group, or make a conference call. Moreover, it allows you to share your current location with your friends or share photos. I think this app is a great tool to communicate with friends, for example when you want to hang out together, invite them to a party, get everybody to the right spot, and afterwards share your party pix. Beluga is an app with  the very same idea, that was taken over by Facebook just a few weeks ago.

 

Hashable

My favorite among the apps presented at the SXSW conference is Hashable, a check-in for people. “Location is to Foursquare what people are to Hashable,” CEO Michael Yavonditte explains. The service allows users to share with others who they had lunch with, they ran into, talked to in a call and much more. To do so, you choose the activity from a list of tags (e.g. #raninto, #lunch, #beer) and then connect it to a user (you can import contacts from Twitter or your email account). You can also make introductions between connections or exchange digital business cards. What makes this app so interesting for me, is the database created by keeping record of all your relationships. It follows the development I described in a recent blog post, towards a more structured way of sharing with others what you are up to.

 

Zaarly

Zaarly is a very interesting app that creates a localized market place by connecting people looking for something and others who can provide it. Let’s say you decide spontaneously to watch a movie tonight but you don’t have the movie yourself. Post your wish on Zaarly and let people around you know how much you would pay to have it in a certain amount of time. Somebody standing at a DVD rental in your neighborhood might see it and get you what you want. The app also allows you to communicate with your potential vendor via an anonymous phone number, and soon both sides will be able to rate each other after the deal took place.

Sources: mashable.com, t3n.de (German)

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15 Mrz 2011, 10:08pm
by Katharina Familia Almonte

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Quote: Apples and Blackberries

“Life was easier when an Apple and Blackberry were just fruits.”

Juan Senor (IMC) at the Digital Innovator’s Summit.

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I am watching Dexter and reading Harry Potter

The trend of sharing in social networks whatever we are up to in the very moment (“What’s on your mind” on Facebook, “What’s happening” on Twitter) produces day after day tons of unstructured data. With the rise of Foursquare a more specific and structured way of sharing “real life” activities evolved, like the “check-in” at a defined Point of Interest (POI).

The German startup business Applab just released an iPhone app following this same development. The app waydoo (“What are you doing?”) is nothing new, there already are a couple of similar applications on the American market. However, I want to take it as an example for an interesting specialization of the “what are you up to”-movement.

Users of waydoo can share with their friends what TV show or movie they are watching, what songs or radio channel they are listening to or what book they are reading. In short, waydoo allows you (per app or website) to report your use of media. The user can only “check-in” at products stored in the waydoo database, that in this case is focusing on the German media market. Other users can like or comment on check-ins and earn points and badges for their activities on the platform.

iPhone App waydoo

The advantage of specialized networks like waydoo (compared to Twitter where users just type in an empty text field): This method generates a lot more structured data. This can be used to obtain more information about media usage and user preferences. Waydoo shows ratings of TV shows according to the number of users that checked in to a show. With a high amount of users this information could one day deliver useful data to TV companies.

Last but not least the most important question: How is Applab planning to make money with waydoo? They want to build partnerships with media providers or offer TV channels, radio stations or film producers in-app ad spaces. Moreover, for example a TV station could design an individual badge and reward users frequently checking in to its TV shows.

Source: netzwertig.com

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